Course Descriptions

Always search the official UNCG Course Offerings web page for class schedule details and updates.
https://banweb.uncg.edu/prod/hwzkcoff.P_UncgSlctCrsOff

Always refer to the UNCG Graduate School Bulletin for a list of gerontology faculty, degrees offered,  and requirements.
http://uncg.smartcatalogiq.com/en/2014-2015/Graduate-Bulletin/Departmental-and-Program-Listings/Gerontology-Department

 

Descriptions of UNCG Gerontology Program Courses:

 

GRO 501 — Seminar: Critical Issues of Aging
An intensive review and analysis of the literature and research on the issues of aging and the unresolved problems. 3 credit hours. Usually taught fall semester, Mondays 5:30-8:20 p.m. Usually completed in the first fall semester enrolled in the program.

GRO 600 — Proseminar in Gerontology
An introduction to the profession and study of gerontology including career roles and paths, professional development, ethics, and research processes and procedures. Students are introduced to the ethical and career development dimensions of the profession including such topics as career roles and paths and research processes and conduct. Students begin their exploration of topics to be continued in the capstone course for master’s students. Ideally, students will take the Proseminar in their first semester. 1 credit hour. Usually taught fall semester on two Saturdays.

GRO 610 — Life Planning for the Third Age
Integrative approach to explore how trends in finances, relationships, health, self-development, housing and work and leisure time interact to affect quality of life and options available to aging adults. 3 credit hours. Usually taught Tuesdays 2:00-4:50 p.m.

GRO 611 – Issues in Aging and Business
Students chose two among GRO 611A, 611B, and 611C

GRO 611A – Issues in Aging and Business: Silver Industries
A comprehensive overview of the gerontological trends and associated business consequences that characterize an aging society. Case illustrations are highlighted. This course is part of the “aging” block of coursework in the Aging and Business concentration within the Gerontology Program master’s program.

Silver Industries provides a comprehensive overview of the gerontological trends and associated business consequences that characterize an aging society, primarily looking at the United States but with cross-national comparisons where instructive. The course uses the “four lenses of aging – population, individual, family and generational – to examine aging. Analysis focuses on middle-aged and older persons as workers, earners, consumers, savers, investors, and planners for retirement, noting significant changes between the 20th and 21st Century. The seven week 1.5 credit hour format is designed to complete the Bryan School of Business MBA. This course is attractive not only to Gerontology students but to others seeking electives with an interest in aging and business. 1.5 credit hours. (Note: This topic is sometimes taught in more detail as a 3-hour GRO 676 special topics course.)

GRO 611B – Issues in Aging and Business: Boomer Demographic Phenomena
The Boomer Demographic Phenomena provides a comprehensive overview of the current societal, economic and demographic trends associated with applied demographic exercises used in planning. The course begins by examining the historical and economic consequences leading to the ‘Baby Boom’ and includes a brief history of the American Baby Boom’s influence on public policy, politics, education and the labor force. The course then turns its attention to how “baby boomers” will shape the new future public and private market sectors. Students learn how to account for the influence that “Boomer” demographics have when planning and forecasting future markets, service delivery and products.

Students who enter the professional practice of gerontology across a wide-range of settings find this course relevant including those who practice direct services and care management, health and wellness programming, product development and marketing, policy and program development, or financial gerontology. The seven week 1.5 credit hour format is designed to complete the Bryan School of Business MBA. This course is attractive not only to Gerontology students but to others seeking electives with an interest in aging and business. 1.5 credit hours. (Note: This topic is sometimes taught in more detail as a 3-hour GRO 676 special topics course.)

GRO 611C – Issues in Aging and Business: Workforce and Human Resources Policies for an Aging Society
Examines how countries facing crises stemming from aging populations, retirement, and economic factors related to aging societies address older worker concerns, employer policies and programs, and government intervention in workforce issues.

Many countries including the USA, most European countries, Japan, and even China face a crisis: the aging of their populations due to declining birthrates, longer life-spans, the retirement of baby boomers reaching age 60 from 2006 onward, and the demands of a global economy for creative human resource programs and policies. Such crises operate at several levels: (1) social, including the financing of social benefits and pension-fund demands; (2) economic, especially global competitiveness emphasizing innovation and rising human resource costs; (3) organizational, as evidenced in competition for talent and the loss or preservation of knowledge, and (4) individually, as working men and women face the challenges of retirement or continue full-time or part-time employment.

The course also addresses questions of whether older men and women want to work longer, are healthy enough to work later in life, whether employees want to employ older workers, and what Human Resource policies and programs can be developed by employers, the government, and other organizations to support the aging workforce.

The seven week 1.5 credit hour format is designed to complete the Bryan School of Business MBA. This course is attractive to Gerontology students and others seeking electives with an interest in aging and business. 1.5 credit hours. (Note: This topic is sometimes taught in more detail as a 3-hour GRO 676 special topics course)

GRO 620 — Research Methods in Gerontology
The integration and application of qualitative and quantitative research designs and methods used in gerontology. Additional attention focuses on forming and writing a research proposal. 3 credit hours. Prerequisites: GRO 501 and permission of instructor. Usually taught spring semester, Wednesday, 2:00-4:50 p.m.

GRO 621 and 621D — Health & Aging
This web-based course examines aspects of health and aging from an integration of bio-medical and psycho-social perspectives and provides a foundation for the professional practice of gerontology. Along with Critical Issues in Aging (GRO 501), this course lays the foundation for the understanding of older adults from the biomedical and psychosocial perspectives that is essential to the practice of gerontology. Students should take this required course within the first year after admission to their program of study within the overall Gerontology Program.

Topics covered in Health and Aging include normal aging, health and wellness, changes with aging, functional and cognitive impairment, competency, health care, long term care and palliative care, death and dying. Students who enter the professional practice of gerontology across a wide-range of settings will find this course relevant including those who practice direct services and care management, health and wellness programming, product development and marketing, policy and program development or financial gerontology. 3 credit hours. Usually taught spring semester, online. (Note: Students should take this required course within the first year after admission to a gerontology program.)

GRO 622 — Financing Longevity: Topics in Insurance
Overview of concepts and products of insurance related to financing longevity in the United States. This course is designed with two objectives: (1) to make students aware of the many federal, state and local programs, private insurances, and lesser-known options older adults have in covering their healthcare costs and (2) to provide students with an understanding of how each of these programs or options are designed, how they operate and how Older Adults can access these sources of healthcare funding.

Topics include Medicare, Medicaid, long term care insurance and related products. Students pursuing a MS in Gerontology with Aging and Business concentration are required to take this course. It provides a fundamental understanding of personal, governmental and private-sector roles in financing longevity in the United States through participation in insurance programs and the conceptual framework for consideration of individual choices and policy options to address the aging of society.

Students who enter the professional practice of gerontology across a wide-range of settings will find this course relevant including those who practice direct services and care management, health and wellness programming, product development and marketing, policy and program development or financial gerontology. 3 credit hours. Usually taught fall semester, Tuesdays 5:30 – 8:20 p.m.

GRO 631 — Planning and Evaluation for Professionals in Aging
This course offers an introduction to the knowledge and skills related to planning and evaluating innovative responses to the aging of society for agencies, businesses, and other organizations in the aging network, using program theory as a foundation. This course prepares students for positions including aging planners in Area Agencies on Aging or state units on aging, product developers for corporations seeking to reach aging markets, managers of aging services, programs, organizations and initiatives.

Students examine diffusion of innovation, strategic planning, program planning, logic model development, outcome and indicator development, evaluation methods and approaches, quality improvement, performance monitoring, accreditation, consumer satisfaction and quality report cards, and reporting of and contracting for planning and evaluation information. 3 credit hours.

GRO 632– Communities Responding to an Aging Society
Addresses community responses to an aging society and how those responses may be enhanced through civic engagement, infrastructure development, and public/private initiatives. Additionally, emphasizes developing and sustaining innovative programs.

Communities are the front line of response to the challenges and opportunities of an aging society and the common ground for civic engagement in American public life. Over the past decade, governmental, philanthropic and university-based initiatives across the U.S. have increasingly recognized the critical role that communities play to meet the needs of a growing aging population. This course covers the range of community responses and the potential for communities to enhance those responses.

This course is primarily designed for students pursuing a graduate certificate or master’s degree in gerontology or a certificate in non-profit management. Students exploring these programs or other graduate level students with interests in aging — including those in business administration, public administration, public health, social work and nursing – may also be interested. 3 credit hours.

GRO 633 — Long Term Care Public Policy
Covers policy perspectives of the broad range of long term services and support for frail older adults and their caregivers including: home and community-based care and chronic disease management, residential options such as assisted living, nursing homes and continuing care retirement communities. Also addressed are quality and regulatory issues and policy theory and frameworks.

There is a special focus on a timely aspect of policy related to frail older adults/caregivers given developments in the policy arena. Implications of health reform are a focus with a special emphasis on “dual eligibles”– older adults who are eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid. Policy initiatives at the state and federal level (e.g. PACE) are aimed at both improving quality of care/life and reducing costs related to this very vulnerable group of older adults. Development of policy brief writing and related skills are emphasized. 3 credit hours.

GRO 649 — Gerontology Internship or Research Experience I
First internship or research experience for graduate students in gerontology. Supervised experience as a participant-observer in a structured setting for older adults enables students to link theory and practice and increase professional experience. Alternatively a student can conduct supervised research in an area of gerontology relevant area to his or her professional development. Course requirements include140 to 160 hours in a program-approved site chosen from among nonprofit, governmental, or business settings. (Graded on S-U basis). Prerequisites: GRO 501 and permission of instructor. 3 credit hours. GRO 649-01 taught fall, spring, and summer by Dr. Janice Wassel. GRO 649-02 taught fall and spring by Dr. Rebecca Adams.

GRO 651 — Integrative Seminar in Gerontology
Integration of current literature and theoretical applications in gerontology focusing on specific area(s) of student’s specialty and practicum experiences. Additional emphasis is on professional writing, presentations, networks, extramural funding, and resume or CV development. This seminar also is referred to as the student’s Capstone Experience. Master of Science (MS) students should take this course as close to the end of their program of study as possible because it is designed to tie concepts together. 3 credit hours. Usually taught spring semester, Thursday, 5:30-8:20 p.m

GRO 676 – Special Topics in Gerontology
The topic of this course varies according to faculty and student interest. Sections are usually taught for 1 or 3 credits. Topics addressed previously include: Life Course and Well-Being in Later Life; Dying, Death and Bereavement, and Social Implications of an Aging Society (cross-listed with SOC 686). In addition, the topics normally covered in GRO 611 for 1.5 credits are sometimes taught in more detail as 3 credit hour courses as GRO 676.

GRO 679 — Gerontology Internship or Research Experience II
Final internship or research experience for master’s students in gerontology. Supervised experience as a participant-observer in a structured setting for older adults enables students to link theory and practice and increase professional experience. Alternatively a student can conduct supervised research in an area of gerontology relevant area to his or her professional development. Course requirements include160 to 200 hours in a program-approved site chosen from among nonprofit, governmental, or business settings. (Graded on S-U basis). Prerequisites: Admission to the MS in gerontology. Completion of at least 2/3 course work, including GRO 501, GRO 600, GRO 620, and GRO 649, CITI certification for social and behavioral sciences, and permission of instructor. 3credit hours. GRO 679-01 taught by Dr. Janice Wassel during fall, spring, and summer semesters. GRO 679-02 taught by Dr. Rebecca Adams during fall and summer semesters.

GRO 695 — Independent Study
Intensive individualized study in an area of special interest in gerontology. 1-3 hours credit. Prerequisites: Requires permission of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 semester hours credit. GRO 695-01 taught by Dr. Jan Wassel fall, spring, and summer semesters. GRO 695-02 taught by Dr. Rebecca Adams, fall and spring semesters.

GRO 699 — Thesis
Individual guidance in the development of a specific research problem. (Graded on S-U basis) Prerequisites: GRO 501, GRO 620, GRO 649, GRO 651, GRO 660 1-6 hours credit. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours credit. GRO 699-01 taught by Dr. Jan Wassel. GRO 699-02 taught by Dr. Rebecca Adams.

GRO 801 — Thesis Extension
Individual guidance in the development of a specific research problem. (Graded on S-U basis) 1-6 hours credit. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours credit. GRO 801-01 taught by Dr. Jan Wassel. GRO 801-02 taught by Dr. Rebecca Adams.

GRO 803 — Graduate Research Project Extension
Individual guidance in extended development of a specific research problem. (Graded on S-U basis) 1-6 hours credit. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours credit. GRO 803-01 taught by Dr. Jan Wassel. GRO 803-02 taught by Dr. Rebecca Adams.

 

Remember:

 

UNCG Gerontology Program Degree Requirements:

Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Gerontology required courses are listed at
http://uncg.smartcatalogiq.com/en/2014-2015/Graduate-Bulletin/Departmental-and-Program-Listings/Gerontology-Department/Gerontology-PBC

Master of Science in Gerontology required courses, including the Aging & Business Concentration and the Nonprofit Management Concentration, are listed at
http://uncg.smartcatalogiq.com/en/2014-2015/Graduate-Bulletin/Departmental-and-Program-Listings/Gerontology-Department/Gerontology-MS

MS in Gerontology/ MBA required courses are listed at http://uncg.smartcatalogiq.com/en/2014-2015/Graduate-Bulletin/Departmental-and-Program-Listings/Gerontology-Department/Gerontology-MSMBA